Posts Tagged ‘Dizzy’

Dreamworld Pogie

June 2, 2017

Dreamworld Pogie!

I love it when a plan comes together, especially if it’s someone else’s sweet Kickstarter plan. Dizzy legends the Oliver Twins have released this little gem of a game which arrived last week. The game arrived in its plastic casing and is signed on the front by Philip and Andrew Oliver.

The picture below shows Dreamworld Pogie unboxed! Including A3 poster, sweet manual, signed case and game cartridge, this was a great Kickstarter project brought to use by the awesome folks and the legendary

Just have to dig out my NES now…

@RealityGlitch

Minecraft – The Retro Look

June 1, 2015

After years of internal debate I finally decided to buy Minecraft, I’ve no idea why it took so long but the final thought that won the argument was… “Sure, why not”.

I’ve been playing the single player game, which pretty much goes thus; mining, crafting, building stuff, moving on, mining, crafting, building stuff, moving on, accidentally destroying village and local population, moving on, mining, crafting… you get the picture.

However, in addition to this I’ve also been inspired to build some stuff in creative mode (thanks to Helen on twitter). So feel free take a look at the fruits of my desk based labours below, the internet is alive with good reference material so a little research went into each character before hand. I found it an absorbing,¬†fun and relaxing way to pass the time and a great way to recreate some awesome retro gaming icons.

Excuse me, are you going to eat those?

Excuse me, are you going to eat those?

Inky, Pinky, Blinky and Clyde

Inky, Pinky, Blinky and Clyde

Pac-Man homage!

Pac-Man homage!

Sneaky Goomba

Zool

Dizzy hanging out with Guybrush (MI2)

Dizzy hanging out with Guybrush (MI2)

Dizzy, I love this guy ūüôā

Tetris, seemed a good blocky place to start

Perhaps more to follow soon.

Thanks for looking and take care ūüôā

@RealityGlitch

 

Retro Adverts from Amiga Action

March 30, 2011
Retro Adverts

Amiga Action

Amiga Action 33 June 92

This post will take a look back at some of those more persuasive¬†pages (tucked in between¬†the reviews, previews and cheats sections)¬†in gaming magazines of old, otherwise known as adverts! As an adult (subject to debate) I generally find adverts these days to be tedious and I skip over them as quickly as possible, however, as a child there was nothing better than seeing a brightly coloured, eye-catching¬†ad showing me a glimpse of the next upcoming game to be released. These ads had much more appeal and I certainly didn’t¬†skip over them. I now look back on these ads with fondness, I would turn the page ¬†and the ad would immediately catch my attention with the selection of bright colours,¬†words and pictures (some in-game if you were lucky) and usually¬†persuade¬†me to buy it.

I’ve decided to take a look first at Amiga Action, not my favourite of the Amiga magazines but definitely a good one for a wide selection of ads. Below is a gallery of some of my favourites and hopefully will also¬†stir some similar memories for other Amiga fans! I’m very much an artist at heart and the presentation of the ads really appeals to me to this day, I have the same nostalgic feeling for certain pieces of gaming¬†box art as well. Hope you enjoy and let me know if you have any particular favourite adverts from back in the day, or favourite box art! A few of my favourites from below will always be the great art work on the Gobliiins ad, the distinct word art of Sensible Soccer and the more cartoony looks of Dizzy, Hagar and Parasol Stars.

Please also take a look at the Retro Collect post below who have put together a selection of advertisements from a range of retro gaming magazines!

Advertisements from Retro Game Magazines Part 1

Thanks to Retro Collect for being a constant source of retro awesomeness and inspiration, especially for this post, and to Amiga Magazine Rack for the advertisement scans.

Stop making an egghibit of yourself… Treasure Island Dizzy

February 3, 2011

Treasure Island Dizzy

Genre: Puzzle/Platformer

Year: 1989

Publisher: Codemasters

Disks: 1

Music: Allister Brimble

Ah Treasure Island Dizzy, eggcellent game, you might even say… eggquisite?¬†Ahem. I could crack plenty of those yolks but I eggpect¬†I would lose those few loyal readers I have,¬†and fear they would be poached from me to another blog. Right, all out of my system. Previously I reviewed Spellbound Dizzy, a game I actually don’t like that much, however I thought I’d take a look at the first Dizzy game I ever played, and made me into a long-term fan of the series. Treasure Island Dizzy was the first of¬†the¬†series to¬†appear on the Amiga, but¬†certainly not the worst by¬†a long shot.

The graphics are cute and colourful (as expected) and by todays standards I could probably whip up similar looking sprites and backgrounds in Paint. However, this is one ofAlways good to be on top of things... the first things that attracted me to the game. The game starts with Dizzy trapped on an island, his only means of escape is to solve the usual array of puzzles as well as collect 30 gold coins to secure his passage off the island and to freedom. A simple scenario. The graphics are well drawn and look polished, despite the simple look of the backgrounds and characters. The puzzles are generally simple and follow a logical course, although can be frustrating at points if you leave certain items behind and have to move back and forth to get them.

The gameplay is challenging, not only do you have to solve all the puzzles, as well as collect all the coins, the challenge is more so as you have to complete the game with the single life you are granted at the start. No continues here and mistakes can be pretty deadly.

Snorkel, a valuable piece of kit...

However, because of¬†this, there is pure satisfaction when completing this game as it is more than a trial at times. In this gamers opinion, the only downfall of this title is the music (let’s be honest, Dizzy games never really hit the mark with effective music? – begin debate…?)

The music was composed by Allister Brimble, who had worked on many other popular Amiga games including Alien Breed (1991) Mortal Kombat (1993) and Superfrog (1993), which all make great use of atmospheric and dramatic scores to bring the games to life, which is odd in this instance as I feel the music comes across as extremely (see Рno egg joke) repetitive and just a little irritating in Treasure Island Dizzy. He also composed the music for other Dizzy titles such as Fantasy World Dizzy (1991) and Spellbound Dizzy (1992).

This is a gem of a game with some great and interesting puzzles, nasty traps and one particular nod to one of my all time favourite movies. Pleasant graphics and fun game play this isThis guy will take you for everything you've got, git...

by no means the best or greatest of Dizzy games on the Amiga but is certainly a classic and a great introduction to the series. The single life makes it a challenge and if you don’t like the music, turn it off! Simple.

One of the elements to Treasure Island Dizzy which can make¬†the game¬†very entertaining is the cheat codes (listed below), usually employed when I’ve forgotten a really obvious puzzle and then attempt to crash the game by taking Dizzy to areas of the game the developers didn’t intend you to go to.

Enter one of the following codes during game play to activate the corresponding cheat function.

Effect and  Code

Flight mode Рicanfly 

Invincibility – eggsonlegs

High jumps – eggonaspring

ÔĽŅMagazine Reviews:

Zero 5 Magazine (March 1990) gave Treasure Island Dizzy 78%

Amiga Longplay: Treasure Island Dizzy

Please go to the Yolkfolk.com for all your Dizzy needs and wants.

Treasure Island Dizzy has appeared in many other conversions, notably on the Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS,  NES and the ZX Spectrum.

Spellbound Dizzy (Amiga)

November 26, 2009

Spellbound Dizzy

Developed and published in 1992 by Codemasters Spellbound Dizzy is just one game in a long series of egg related shenanigans involving the Yolkfolk (this time with the help of Theo the Wizard). Each game follows the usual set of rules and gameplay, (puzzle solving platformer with inventory menu and dodgy music) but each retaining its own unique charm. The series was originally developed by the Oliver twins, two British brothers, Philip and Andrew Oliver, who started to professionally develop computer games while they were still at school. However, they had little involvement with this title other than signing the game off and letting Big Red Software take over the design and development aspects of the game.

The game itself is well drawn and immediately boasts about its size *cough* but never really gets further than that in the interesting stakes. The graphics are bright and colorful, the usual combination of cartoonish scenery and well drawn objects throughout. 

However, compared to earlier games, this one seems inferior in design and presentation, even with the extra animation scenes such as Dizzy becoming stunned, swimming and the mine cart.

Spellbound Dizzy does feature some minor differences in game play from other Dizzy games; fruit and cakes are dotted around to restore energy, water doesn’t kill instantly, although without the aqua lung drowning is inevitable, and the mushrooms (magic?) are spinny objects that can propel Dizzy to greater heights, allowing him to reach unseen platforms and the odd cloud. Unfortunately these minor differences in game play don’t really make up for the lack of storytelling (it’s nice to have a little bit), puzzles that don’t seem to make much sense, and some very irritating music. 

Long and ever so slightly dull (being generous) the Dizzy games seem to work best when they are kept simple and short, this makes them a lot more fun to play as opposed to (an hour in) switching the music off and wanting to throw Dizzy from a great height shouting ‚ÄúSurvive that!‚ÄĚ

As much as I love other Dizzy games this one didn‚Äôt work for me, childhood memories tell me it was a lot more fun ‘back in the day’, in my opinion there are better games in the series, Fantasy World Dizzy (1991), Magicland Dizzy (1991), that are genuinely still fun to play as an adult.

Need more Dizzy? Visit this  fan site for more info!