Posts Tagged ‘Reality Glitch’

Reality Glitch Plays: Licence to Kill

January 25, 2017

In your best Gladys Knight >>> “Got a licence to kill, and you know I’m going straight for your heart”…

… or perhaps not, as you’ll see from the video my aim is terrible, broad sides of barns topple over in fits of laughter as I approach.

I’ve been playing some Bond games on the Amiga recently (The Spy Who Loved Me, Live and Let Die, Licence to Kill) and they pretty much all follow the same format each time, top down racing shooter, impossible controls, general terrible game play and hard as nails.

This one in particular wasn’t as much of a ball ache as the others, so that’s an instant thumbs up. I also enjoyed the Bond-esque theme and Timothy Dalton artwork at the start. Not much else to praise though.

In other news I wish Timothy Dalton had started his Bond career with A View to a Kill and then finished with GoldenEye. We definitely needed more Dalton as Bond.

Enjoy and all the best!

@RealityGlitch

Advertisements

Reality Glitch Nostalgia Trip: Leisure Suit Larry

September 23, 2016

Trying out the age protection questions at the start of Leisure Suit Larry on the Amiga for laughs (or not). No game play this time, just a nostalgia trip.

Loading up this game for the first time when I was 10 was an event. I was completely baffled by the bright colours, cheesy music and the weird fella in the white suit chasing a blow up doll. Not that I had any idea what a blow up doll actually was. All I knew was that this was a puzzle adventure game, and I loved them.

The questions at the beginning to get into the game (to prove you were old enough to play) proved just as challenging as the game itself and the puzzles contained within. I have great memories of sitting for ages trying to get these right, occasionally asking my mum random questions to see if she knew any answers that could help me out, for example “who is Joan Collins?”, or “what’s a prophylactic?”.

Good times.

Thanks for watching!

@RealityGlitch

Reality Glitch Plays: Pinball Dreams and Lemmings

September 21, 2016

Pinball Dreams

pinball_dreams_01

The only Pinball game I’ve ever owned and played on my Amiga. Also the only Pinball game I’ve ever played full stop, on a computer and in reality.

Weirdly I mention two You Tube peeps in this video, and they’re both awesome!

Steve Benway’s Channel here.
Freakin Frankie’s Channel here.

Lemmings

l1

Playing some Lemmings, the sarcasm flows nicely in this one, as does my apparent lack of ability to speak clearly or loudly. Making these videos really is an eye opener.

Anyway, classic Lemmings from back in the day, was played at home (on the Amiga) and in school (on the Acorn), just on official break times of course…

Thanks for watching!

@RealityGlitch

Reality Glitch Plays: Chips Challenge

May 11, 2016

Well, a bit of it anyway, its got 144 levels.

In Chips Challenge you take on the role of Chip, our nerdy hero who is trying to impress Melinda and get into the Bit Busters club and um, ‘integrate technologies’ with her (words on the advert, not mine). The game is a vast (I play the first 10 levels here) and of varying difficulty. It has a whole host of weird enemies, traps and pitfalls try to prevent you from reaching your goal at every turn.

Using your wits and cunning you must navigate Chip safely to each level exit by solving puzzles and in most cases collecting a number of chips along the way.  You’ll need to use objects such as handy keys (blue, yellow, green and red) as well as shields to protect you from fire and water, boots to help you navigate ice, and a magnet to help you move about on what I’ve always thought was a demented escalator.

Anyways, have a watch of the video below and let me know your thoughts and memories about Chips Challenge!

I’ve also taken a quick look at Chips Challenge before in my blog post ‘Puzzling, one disk wonders on the Amiga

All the best!

@RealityGlitch

Reality Glitch You Tube Channel

April 11, 2016

Its pretty rough around the edges, and there’s no real consistency yet, but hey, I’m getting there! I’ve made some shiny custom thumbnails for each video (from this point onward) and have decided there’s probably at least 3 types of videos I’ll do, game play, shenanigans and nostalgia.

See below for examples of each:

Game Play – Reality Glitch Plays: Final Fight (still not able to do commentary eh? – Ed)

 

Shenanigans – Workbench Shenanigans: The ‘Joys’ of Workbench 

 

Nostalgia – Reality Glitch Nostalgia Trip: LSD Docs Disk – 25 

Thanks for watching 🙂

@RealityGlitch

 

Reality Check

April 14, 2015
Boo.

Boo.

Good news everyone, sort of… If you thought I didn’t post much now, just wait until August. Time for another Reality Check, this one though might have longer term effects on life in general… What I’m trying to say is, and badly, I’m going to be a Dad by the summer time!

It’s not immediately time to pack up all the games and consoles but preparations are being made to put a lot of stuff into the loft, and make room for new things, such as a cot, moses basket… and other foreign objects I’m learning all about (pram shopping is one hell of an experience, like buying a car, but more confusing).

Gaming won’t stop completely, but there’s a good chance the posts here on Reality Glitch might. I’m inspired by the amount of retro gaming Dads out there on twitter, proving that it is possible to continue your hobby whilst having kids, but at the moment I’m not wanting the distraction, I’m panicking enough as it is.

My Amiga 500 will be packed away neatly in its original box, the games stored in large plastic crates, the other games and consoles too. They might make an appearance again one day. I’ll still be tweeting away about random retro stuff, and re-tweeting all your awesome finds, pictures, reviews and collections as usual, so please follow me on twitter below.

Back in the loft with you old friend.

Thanks for reading, and donations of pipes, slippers and other Dad stuff welcome…

All the best

@RealityGlitch

Horace and the Spiders

March 9, 2011

Horace and the Spiders

Platform: ZX Spectrum 16K 

Release Date: 1983 

Publisher: Sinclair Research Ltd (UK)

Developer: Psion Software Ltd (William Tang)

Players:

Controls: Keyboard 

Genre: Platformer

The ZX Spectrum, I’ve played on the actual machine probably about a dozen times, and over twenty years ago (mostly Dizzy). After asking which games I should review next I was pleasantly surprised about the number of different platforms, games and genres people wanted to see again. A request for Horace made it past the line first so I immediately set about trying to find the game! Fortunately, this is a well-known, and therefore widely available ’emulated’ game but I was unable to play it on the original system.

Horace and the Spiders is the 3rd game in the Horace series, following Hungry Horace and Horace goes Skiing. The last in the series was Horace to the Rescue. The plot is pretty simple (although some reviews back in the day penned it as complicated) Horace must negotiate his way through 3 treacherous levels. The first, up some hills whilst avoiding spiders. The second, swinging across a chasm on spider threads. The third and final show down, a platform level where Horace must defeat the remaining arachnids by creating holes in the web, luring the spiders into the holes to fix them and consequently jumping on them.

The game is very simple to finish, the graphics are neat and the game play isn’t actually bad, considering the length. Each level has its own distinct colours and design (Horace even changes colour) and challenges. The characters are clear and animated well, and even though I have no idea who or what Horace is, its a great leading character. 

It’s extrememly satisfying outwitting the spiders on the final level and jumping up and down on them. After playing for about 15 minutes though my attention drifted, so I decided to give the other Horace games a go. They are all pretty distinct in graphics and gameplay which makes this a fun series of games to play, I actually found Horace Goes Skiing really challenging (who puts a ski shop on the other side of the motorway) but fun once I actually got to do some skiing.

Reading some of the reviews its fascinating to see how good reviewers said it was, and they were right, at that time of course. Not that great in my opinion (watch out for the collision detection jumping over those spiders) and not the best in the Horace series (Horace goes Skiing ftw) but Horace and the Spiders was clearly a welcome addition to the series, it was fun to visit and to play.  

Please visit My Speccy for more information on the Horace games and on the Spectrum, as well as a chance to play the game!

For more information on Horace and the Spiders visit the World of Spectrum

Horace Series advert (Popular Computing Weekly, Issue 830915, p.29)  and Horace and the Spiders advert (Home Computing Weekly, Issue 20, p.41  from World of Spectrum

Stop making an egghibit of yourself… Treasure Island Dizzy

February 3, 2011

Treasure Island Dizzy

Genre: Puzzle/Platformer

Year: 1989

Publisher: Codemasters

Disks: 1

Music: Allister Brimble

Ah Treasure Island Dizzy, eggcellent game, you might even say… eggquisite? Ahem. I could crack plenty of those yolks but I eggpect I would lose those few loyal readers I have, and fear they would be poached from me to another blog. Right, all out of my system. Previously I reviewed Spellbound Dizzy, a game I actually don’t like that much, however I thought I’d take a look at the first Dizzy game I ever played, and made me into a long-term fan of the series. Treasure Island Dizzy was the first of the series to appear on the Amiga, but certainly not the worst by a long shot.

The graphics are cute and colourful (as expected) and by todays standards I could probably whip up similar looking sprites and backgrounds in Paint. However, this is one ofAlways good to be on top of things... the first things that attracted me to the game. The game starts with Dizzy trapped on an island, his only means of escape is to solve the usual array of puzzles as well as collect 30 gold coins to secure his passage off the island and to freedom. A simple scenario. The graphics are well drawn and look polished, despite the simple look of the backgrounds and characters. The puzzles are generally simple and follow a logical course, although can be frustrating at points if you leave certain items behind and have to move back and forth to get them.

The gameplay is challenging, not only do you have to solve all the puzzles, as well as collect all the coins, the challenge is more so as you have to complete the game with the single life you are granted at the start. No continues here and mistakes can be pretty deadly.

Snorkel, a valuable piece of kit...

However, because of this, there is pure satisfaction when completing this game as it is more than a trial at times. In this gamers opinion, the only downfall of this title is the music (let’s be honest, Dizzy games never really hit the mark with effective music? – begin debate…?)

The music was composed by Allister Brimble, who had worked on many other popular Amiga games including Alien Breed (1991) Mortal Kombat (1993) and Superfrog (1993), which all make great use of atmospheric and dramatic scores to bring the games to life, which is odd in this instance as I feel the music comes across as extremely (see – no egg joke) repetitive and just a little irritating in Treasure Island Dizzy. He also composed the music for other Dizzy titles such as Fantasy World Dizzy (1991) and Spellbound Dizzy (1992).

This is a gem of a game with some great and interesting puzzles, nasty traps and one particular nod to one of my all time favourite movies. Pleasant graphics and fun game play this isThis guy will take you for everything you've got, git...

by no means the best or greatest of Dizzy games on the Amiga but is certainly a classic and a great introduction to the series. The single life makes it a challenge and if you don’t like the music, turn it off! Simple.

One of the elements to Treasure Island Dizzy which can make the game very entertaining is the cheat codes (listed below), usually employed when I’ve forgotten a really obvious puzzle and then attempt to crash the game by taking Dizzy to areas of the game the developers didn’t intend you to go to.

Enter one of the following codes during game play to activate the corresponding cheat function.

Effect and  Code

Flight mode – icanfly 

Invincibility – eggsonlegs

High jumps – eggonaspring

Magazine Reviews:

Zero 5 Magazine (March 1990) gave Treasure Island Dizzy 78%

Amiga Longplay: Treasure Island Dizzy

Please go to the Yolkfolk.com for all your Dizzy needs and wants.

Treasure Island Dizzy has appeared in many other conversions, notably on the Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Atari ST, Commodore 64, MS-DOS,  NES and the ZX Spectrum.

Top 5 Platformers (Amiga)

March 1, 2010

Top 5 platform games on the

Amiga

It’s always difficult to name a top 5, especially when there are so many great games on the Amiga to choose from. I’ve based this small list on games I love to replay, whether on my Amiga or emulated. They also tap into deep rooted childhood memories and good times to match!

I will emphasise this list “is in my opinion” (ah, the wonders of a blog) as with any “top list” on any subject it will spark debate, which is a healthy thing anyway and hopefully some of you will put forward some of your top platformers for the Amiga as well! 

After playing through a few of my favourites, and ones I haven’t played before, my list grew substantially from the initial 5. However, as much as I’d love to waffle on these games will be hailed as an honourable mention and came close to making my list; Superfrog, Rodland, Rainbow Islands, Harlequin, Gods and Wolfchild. 

 Flashback 

Flashback is an immensely good game with great graphics and great cut scenes to move the game along in-between each level. It moves away from the usual “bouncy, jumpy” platformer and provides more of an RPG feel to it. The controls are smooth and really run well with the graphics. The intense music really sets the atmosphere for the whole game and the sound effects throughout set the tone nicely. Gameplay and appearance is similar in style to Another World but Flashback has a longer, and in my opinion better storyline (the puzzles are trickier but also follow a logical pattern). A great mix of action and puzzle solving Flashback is one I can play over and over again, even the courier jobs in level 2 aren’t all that bad. I love the intro sequence to this game and it sticks firmly in my memory to this day, the graphics blew me away and with the upbeat music felt like you were watching the intro to a movie. Good times.  

Amiga Computing 62 (Jul 1993) gave Flashback 94%  

The Great Giana Sisters  

Whichever way you like at the Great Giana Sisters people will always shout out something about Mario, but I remember first loading this up on my Amiga and being hooked right away (for an eight year old boy the title screen was fascinating in itself). I felt no need to sit there and think “this is just like that NES game” and so I played through without the hindrance of over analysis that seems to limit the mind once you’ve reached adulthood. I took it for what it was, the graphics were bright and colourful, the gameplay fun and easy going but still retained that challenging aspect to it (timing some jumps was essential). It’s certainly not the easiest game to complete and the 2 player option is just basically the same thing over again but you’ll want to make it to the end, just because. It’s also one of the few games on my Amiga I remember my sister playing (alongside Monster Business, Magic Serpent and Chips Challenge) and as far as I remember she was able to get much further through the game than I could… probably had more patience. An awesome game and worth revisiting, the music is pretty lively too.  

Article in AUI Vol. 2 No. 9 (Sep 1988) for The Great Giana Sisters
 
Turrican II  

As soon as I read or think of the name Turrican the same funky signature theme tune pops into my head and I instantly feel the need to load it up. Turrican is a fast paced platformer and one where it’s not wise to stop for too long, the amount of enemies on screen doesn’t slow the game down and you’ll always find you’re up against an enemy. The game has a great variety of weapons in order to help you take out bad guys in more ways than one; namely bounce, laser and multiple, (add in the extra morph-ball move) and you have everything you need to make it through the games 5 distinct worlds, each with its own great piece of music by Chris Huelsbeck. I love it for its intensity and non-stop gameplay, the graphics look clean and polished and I find its one of the more challenging platformers for the Amiga. On more than one occasion this game has grabbed my attention, and is one of the few times playing it became more important than being called down for dinner. Turrican II is certainly my favourite of the series but I do have a soft spot for Turrican III, mainly for the cool swingy gadget.  

CU Amiga (Feb 1992) review of Turrican II scored 94%  

Magic Pockets  

I played this because I saw it being played on Saturday morning TV (either Motormouth or Going Live!). Either way during the shows the contestant played the game either by shouting the controls down the phone or by using a touch tone phone. I loved the little character (Bitmap Kid) and the ‘cool’ (for the 90’s) animated intro sequence. BK had a unique way of taking out the bad guys, although it never made much sense why a snail would change into a candy cane after being engulfed by a whirlwind which came out someone’s pocket… crazy as that sounds when you write it down it makes sense in this awesome game. Another great from the Bitmap Brothers! The game is long enough to keep you amused for hours, until you turn to look at the clock and realise your late for school (you then get to school and remember it’s a Saturday) and feel like a complete ninny, but with the added bonus you can return home and carry on playing. The level designs are brilliant and the secret passages add an extra puzzle element to the gameplay. The game includes an impressive variety of bad guys and extra levels to keep you reaching into to your pockets for a long time to come… ooo er.  

Amiga Action 25 (Oct 1991) gave Magic Pockets 93%  

James Pond II: Robocod  

Who doesn’t want to save a bunch of hapless penguins at Christmas time from the evil yet brightly coloured clutches of James Ponds arch nemesis Dr. Maybe? It’s certainly one of the most memorable platformers for me as I was a huge fan of the James Bond movies (still am, natch) and the first Pond game. In order to defeat Dr. Maybe (who has taken over Santa’s workshop in the North Pole) Pond is equipped with a robotic suit which allows him to extend is body and grip onto very high platforms, and then shimmy along them past all manner of bad guys and deadly traps. Robocod is a great game and a welcome improvement on the gameplay of the first game (I found the underwater controls far too sensitive and the gameplay very repetitive). Robocod also introduces a series of vehicles for our hero to use adding another dimension to the game, these include a car, plane and um, a bathtub. The game looks and feels polished and is definitely the best in the series (the third game felt like a combination of the first and second without the cool robotic suit) and for all its colour and overly cute level designs the game is the most challenging, and in some places just a little bit sinister.  

Amiga Power 7 (Nov 1991) gave James Pond II: Robocod 87%  

Hope found this Top 5 enjoyable and informative, 2 awesome resource sites for everything Amiga can be found here at Amiga Magazine Rack and Lemon Amiga!  

I have also previosuly reviewed Superfrog! Check it out here!